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Home > Document Library > Poverty and Welfare > Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Milligan


Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Milligan

April 6, 1816


[Jefferson affirms that the main purpose of society is to enable human beings to keep the fruits of their labor. — TGW]

 

To take from one, because it is thought that his own industry and that of his fathers has acquired too much, in order to spare to others, who, or whose fathers have not exercised equal industry and skill, is to violate arbitrarily the first principle of association, "the guarantee to every one of a free exercise of his industry, and the fruits acquired by it." If the overgrown wealth of an individual be deemed dangerous to the State, the best corrective is the law of equal inheritance to all in equal degree; and the better, as this enforces a law of nature, while extra taxation violates it.

[From Writings of Thomas Jefferson, ed. Albert E. Bergh (Washington: Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, 1904), 14:466.]





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